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10 Things that Must Consider by Cinematographer

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Cinematographer

DSLR cameras are used to shoot more and more movies. Therefore, we have decided to share your tips to help you use high-quality materials with these cameras. Talk to Regal organized an opportunity for the best film artists and recorded what is important to film a movie. They mentioned some important things for every young filmmaker.

Bitrate and Compression:

Compression reduces the amount of data produced by a digital SLR. During video recording, all DSLR cameras use some compression methods. If you are used to taking JPEG photos, you are used to making a compressed image. RAW can also be produced with compression, but this format is generally considered uncompressed. This happens because it is common to believe that compression is a process that some of the data begins to compress a file. So we get a picture in pixels that can't be in the best format because of missing data.

The most popular formats for DSLR are h.264 and MJPEG. Both forms are compressed with loss, but h.264 is better.

Bitrate is the amount of data used to store a second of content. Of course, a higher bit rate is better because it compresses files with less loss.

Lenses and Aspect Ratio:

The screen proportions have become a much less important problem for filmmakers. Previously, the standard 4: 3 ratio (1.33: 1) was not attractive on standard TV screens, as this content was intended for TV shows and people saw widescreen formats in cinemas.

HDTV is currently standard widescreen, with a ratio of 16: 9 (1,78: 1), which is very close to the traditional 1.85 formats. 1. Another ratio, 2.35: 1, is often used in large budget films.

2.35: 1 film is usually shot with an anamorphic lens. Such lenses are not spherical as you can see in the picture below. They allow you to stretch the image on a vertical or horizontal axis. These lenses are large screens during shooting, and the image is enlarged to appear on full screens.

Focal Length:

The focal length is the distance at which the collimated beams fall to the point. In other words, the focus is responsible for the expansion of the image. A large value of this distance, for example, 100 mm, magnifies the objects and small value, for example, 35 mm, reduces the same objects. The focal point is also responsible for the viewpoint. Excellent value for money gives a closer view and a little bigger.

Bokeh:

Bokeh is the blurred effect of parts of the image. In the process of creating a movie, bokeh not only makes the image more appealing but also draws the viewer to the desired objects.

Field Depth:

In front, the center and number of objects in the background correspond to the depth of the field. Different depth of field means that only one shot will be targeted. Great depth of field - all shots are concentrated at the same time. The focal length and aperture size determine this value. DSLR cameras have become very popular due to their ability to provide low-depth images.

Exposure:

Exposure is responsible for the time the light hits the sensor. For SLR cameras, this value corresponds to the opening time of the mechanical shutter. But DSLR cameras automatically adjust the shutter speed.

A slower shutter speed produces a softer and lighter image, while a higher shutter speed results in a darker image. The film is usually shot with the shutter open 50% of the time (180 degrees). The best settings for recording with a DSLR camera are 24 frames per second. Second, the shutter is 180 degrees, and the shutter speed is 1/48.

Try selecting a shutter speed between 1/50 and 1/60. But remember that there is no strict and fast shutter speed. Select the value even after the situation.

Frequency of Frame:

In front, the center and number of objects in the background correspond to the depth of the field. Different depth of field means that only one shot will be targeted. Great depth of field - all shots are concentrated at the same time. The focal length and aperture size determine this value. DSLR cameras have become very popular due to their ability to provide low-depth images.

ISO and Noise:

In a cinema, this value refers to the measurement of noise in the image. ISO stands for light sensitivity. The higher the value, the higher the sensitivity.

The relationship between sensitivity and noise is linear. The higher the sensitivity - the brighter the image, the more noise. The DSLR camera handles high sensitivity noise.

Aperture & Exposure:

Exposure is the cause of the amount of light falling into the digital SLR sensor. During recording, the DSLR camera uses a mechanical shutter to adjust the exposure and activate it at the right time. However, an SLR camera can reach the limit of 24 frames per second. Second as fast as a picture? No, because in digital mode, DSLRs use an electronic shutter. The sensor is on and off to adjust the exposure instead of counting on a mechanical shutter.

Aperture is responsible for the camera's ability to record light and the angle at which the light falls on the sensor. A narrow aperture provides a high-depth image while a wide pixel reduces the depth of field.

Interlaced:

Interlaced scanning was developed for older CRTs in the 1930s. Previously, video bidding was more limited, and engineers found a way to split the image into two images and show it to others. Fields. Progressive scanning captures and displays images in the image to improve image quality.

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