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How Much Should You Be Asking for as a Logo Designer

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Let’s face it: no matter what they might say, one will always judge a book by its cover. And things are no different with logos. They are like the cover of a brand and, often, the first medium of contact with a firm. That’s why having a catchy logo is so important. So, all the designing decisions you make will virtually turn out to be profit – in both cultural and economic terms.

Are you following me? The conclusion is clear: do not underestimate your work as a designer. Your job is of great value, and you should be charging fairly for what you do.

But what does ‘fairly’ mean? Stay around, and I’ll help you to find your answer.

Factors to Always Take into Account

Don’t feel alone! Junior and senior designers have been asking themselves for ages how much a logo should cost. Thankfully, so much time debating brought us some highlights. And whatever your situation, some factors always play a role in your final offer. Learn about them now.

Your Expertise

Are you talented? Be honest! How much time do you spend doing research, or improving techniques? Do you have a solid portfolio? Analyze the market, compare your pros with the offer out there, and put yourself in the right baseline. You can always level up, sure, and working is the best way of doing so.

Current Demand

Now and then, context is everything. If you’re too busy, maybe that means you’ve got a lot of requirements, and lastly, you’ve been doing a good job that attracts more and more work. Thus, don’t think twice and increase the price! That’s just like fancy restaurants: as more places are booked months in advance, the more expensive they get.

Specs

It sounds simple, but it’s a huge defense mechanism. While drawing a budget, be clear on how many revisions you’re offering and on what the package includes (e.g.: color studies or a presentation that may be sent to partners). All of these details are work you should be charging.

Turnaround Time You’re Willing to Offer

You can’t let a quick response decrease the quality of work. However, quick responses may value your work, in some circumstances. Imagine a frequent customer calls you with an emergency, and, in 48 hours, you can deliver the logo. In a situation like that, you should apply a ‘last-hour tax’. After all, time is money, isn’t it?

Value-based Pricing

The size and the status of the client are criteria you may adopt to design your budgets. Ask yourself if you’re dealing with a well-established corporation or the new pub around the corner. Even though your dedication should remain the same, the concerns of those two clients will certainly be different. Money, for example, won’t be an issue for the big firm. But that’s not the only reason to charge them more.

Just think with me: a larger market means a larger audience, and more profit. Thus, the image you create to target that audience has greater value.

Hourly-based Pricing

Ideas don’t come up the moment you need them, neither your concentration is always the same. So, this method may turn out to be tricky. However, you can explore it in various ways: the client can pay you monthly in exchange for a given amount of work hours, or you can sell blocks of time (8 hours will cost $X).

By following this method, be careful about the promises you make, and be precise on what you say. Something like ‘I surely can do that in a day.’ or ‘Yeah, in 2 or 4 hours I’ll get the job done.’ may get you into trouble. The rule is: don’t commit just because!

Average Prices and Final Thoughts

Now that you know what to consider when charging for a logo, let’s get to the point. On average, a logo costs between $300 and $1300 (USA prices). In a design agency, the amount can go up to $2500 but, if you’re a freelance designer, the value should be around $300 - $2500.

It’s a huge difference, I know. But all the factors I discussed in this article should give you an idea of which should be your baseline. So, next time you’re designing a logo, follow this guide, and make your price!

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Syandita Malakar Hi guys this is Syandita. I started Business Module Hub to help you all to post updated articles on technologies, gadgets. Although I love to write about travel, food, fashion and so on. I quite love reading the articles of Business Module Hub it always update me about the new technologies and the inventions. Hope you will find Business Module Hub interesting in various way and help you accordingly. Keep blogging and stay connected....!
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